Advertisement

Environmental Risk Assessment of Transgenic Plants: A Case Study of Cucumber Mosaic Virus-Resistant Melon in Japan

  • Yutaka Tabei

Abstract

Genetic engineering is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of plant breeding, and various transgenic crops have been commercialized in the United States, Canada, Australia, and numerous other countries. In 1994, the long-shelf-life transgenic tomato, ‘FLAVR SAVR’, was launched in the United States market. In 1998, herbicide-tolerant transgenic soybeans comprised about 36% and 55% of the soybean cultivation areas in the United States and Argentina, respectively (James 1998). In the same years, transgenic corn was grown in about 22% of the total cultivation area in United States, while herbicide-tolerant canola in Canada increased to 45% of the total cultivation area (James 1998). The global area used for the cultivation of transgenic crops in 1999 is expected to far exceed that in 1998.

Keywords

Transgenic Plant Cucumber Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene Environmental Risk Assessment Transgenic Crop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berg P, Baltimore D, Boyer DW, Cohen SN, Davis RW, Hogness DS, Nathans D, Roblin R, Watson JD, Weissman S, Zinder ND (1974) Potential biohazards of recombinant DNA molecules. Science 185: 303CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berg P, Baltimore D, Brenner S, Roblin RO, Singer MF, (1975) Summary statement of the Asilomar conference on recombinant DNA molecules. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72: 1981–1984PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ewen SWB, Pusztai A (1999) Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine. Lancet 354: 1353–1354PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. James C. (1998) Global review of commercialized transgenic crops. IS AAA brief no. 8. ISAAA, Ithaca, NYGoogle Scholar
  5. Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) (1977) The seed and seedling law. MAFF, TokyoGoogle Scholar
  6. Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) (1989) Guidelines for Application of Recombinant DNA Organisms in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, the Food Industry and Other Related Industries. MAFF, Tokyo, pp 1–67Google Scholar
  7. Losey L, Rayor L, Carter M (1999) Transgenic pollen harms monarch larvae. Nature 399: 214PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. OECD (1986) Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations. OECD Publication 93 86 02 1Google Scholar
  9. OECD (1993a) Safety considerations for biotechnology; scale-up of crop plants. OECD publication 93 93 08 1Google Scholar
  10. OECD (1993b) Safety evaluation of foods derived by modern biotechnology: concepts and principles. OECD publication 93 93 04 1Google Scholar
  11. Proceeding of the 3rd International Symposium on Biosafety Results of Field Tests of Genetically Modified Plants and Microorganisms (1994), Monterey, CA, USAGoogle Scholar
  12. Science and Technology Agency (STA) (1992) Guideline for Recombinant DNA (rDNA) Experiments. STA, Tokyo, pp 1–245Google Scholar
  13. Tabei Y (1999a) Environmental risk assessment of transgenic melon in Japan. Plant Biotechnol 16: 65–68Google Scholar
  14. Tabei Y (1999b) Addressing public acceptance issues for biotechnology: experiences from Japan In: Cohen JI (ed) Managing agricultural biotechnology: addressing research program needs and policy implications. CABI Publishing, UK, 174–183Google Scholar
  15. Tabei Y, Oosawa K, Nishimura S, Hanada K, Yoshioka K, Fujisawa I, Nakajima K (1994a) Environmental risk evaluation of the transgenic melon with coat protein gene of cucumber mosaic virus in a closed and a semi-closed greenhouses (I). Breed Sci 44: 101–105Google Scholar
  16. Tabei Y, Oosawa K, Nishimura S, Watanabe S, Tsuchiya K, Yoshioka K, Fujisawa I, Nakajima K (1994b) Environmental risk evaluation of the transgenic melon with coat protein gene of cucumber mosaic virus in a closed and a semi-closed greenhouses (II). Breed Sci 44: 207–211Google Scholar
  17. The 4th International Symposium on Biosafety Results of Field Tests of Genetically Modified Plants and Microorganisms (1997) Tsukuba, JapanGoogle Scholar
  18. Yoshioka K, Hanada K, Nakazaki Y, Yakuwa T, Minobe Y, Oosawa K (1992) Successful transfer of the cucumber mosaic virus coat protein gene to Cucumis melo L. Jpn J Breed 42: 227–285Google Scholar
  19. Yoshioka K, Hanada K, Harada T, Minobe Y, Oosawa K (1993) Virus resistance in transgenic melons that express coat protein gene of cucumber mosaic virus and in these progenies. Jpn J Breed 43: 629–634Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer -Verlag Tokyo 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yutaka Tabei
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Biotechnology DepartmentNational Institute of Agrobiological SciencesTsukuba, IbarakiJapan

Personalised recommendations