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Elevated Levels of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Plant Environment: Nutrient or Toxin

  • Luit J. De Kok
  • C. Elisabeth E. Stuiver
  • Sue Westerman
  • Ineke Stulen

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a malodorous gas with a typical “rotten egg” odor that can be smelt at levels of 0.02 μl l-1 and higher (for chemical and physical properties of H2S, see the review of Beauchamp et al. 1984). Normally H2S is only present in trace concentrations in the plant environment, but under specific conditions plants may have to cope with elevated levels of H2S in either the pedosphere or atmosphere in both natural vegetation and agriculture. Even though sulfide is a normal intermediate in plant metabolism, the impact of H2S on plants is paradoxical. On the one hand, it may be utilized as a sulfur nutrient, and on the other hand, above a certain threshold level it may negatively affect plant growth and functioning. In this chapter, our present knowledge on the impact of elevated levels of H2S on plants both as nutrient and toxin is reviewed.

Keywords

Hydrogen Sulfide Sulfur Source Sulphur Metabolism Sulfate Uptake Nutritional Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer -Verlag Tokyo 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luit J. De Kok
    • 1
  • C. Elisabeth E. Stuiver
    • 1
  • Sue Westerman
    • 1
  • Ineke Stulen
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant PhysiologyUniversity of GroningenHarenThe Netherlands

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