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Phonosurgery pp 187-195 | Cite as

Potentials for Research

  • Nobuhiko Isshiki

Abstract

Laryngeal framework surgery is capable of changing the position, shape, and tension of the vocal cord to some extent to obtain a good voice. More specifically, it is quite effective in eliminating imperfect closure of the glottis, which results from vocal cord paralysis or atrophy. This type of surgery, however, cannot alter the structural and rheological features of the vocal cord, e.g., a stiff cord due to scarring is incurable. It is still technically difficult to increase the stiffness of the vocal cord or to elevate vocal pitch. It is beyond the scope of this type of surgery to change the mass of the vocal cord, alter the mobility of the vocal cord mucosa, or remobilize the paralyzed vocal cord.

Keywords

Vocal Cord Vocal Cord Paralysis Voice Therapy Voice Production Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuhiko Isshiki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plastic Surgery, School of MedicineKyoto UniversityJapan

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