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Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Experience with 360 Patients (1980–1986)
  • Dries J. M. van der Werf
  • Rob Dreissen
  • Louise Hageman
  • Demetrios Velis
  • Wouter Schievink
  • K. Albrecht
  • O. C. van Gent
Conference paper

Abstract

Faced with a high rate of recurrent bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)—highest in the first 24 h, accumulating up to 20% in the first 2 weeks—and with the increasing incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia, particularly after the use of antifibrinolytics, we started to operate on ruptured cerebral aneurysms as early as possible (usually within 72 h after the bleeding) since 1979. We assumed that the higher operative mortality and morbidity of early surgery would still be an improvement over the increased mortality and morbidity from recurrent bleeding and an increased rate of delayed cerebral ischemia in delayed surgery.

Keywords

Cerebral Ischemia Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Blood Flow Velocity Blood Viscosity Early Surgery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dries J. M. van der Werf
    • 1
  • Rob Dreissen
    • 1
  • Louise Hageman
    • 1
  • Demetrios Velis
    • 1
  • Wouter Schievink
    • 1
  • K. Albrecht
    • 1
  • O. C. van Gent
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryAcademic Medical CenterAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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