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CBF and Metabolism in Moyamoya Disease Following Cervical Sympathectomy

  • Motonobu Kameyama
  • Satoru Fujiwara
  • Akira Takahashi
  • Akira Ogawa
  • Hiroo Sato
  • Jiro Suzuki
Conference paper

Abstract

Due to the fact that there are still many uncertainties concerning the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease, no effective and reliable methods for prevention and treatment of this disease have become firmly established so far. In childhood moyamoya disease, the onset usually presents as symptoms of cerebral ischemia due to repeated transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). The disease gradually progresses and, at a certain stage the symptoms of brain ischemia disappear. At the next stage, many adult cases manifest symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage, particularly intraventricular hemorrhage [9]. For treatment of such pathology, various methods for increasing blood flow to the brain have been attempted.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Internal Carotid Artery Transient Ischemic Attack Moyamoya Disease Superior Cervical Ganglion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Motonobu Kameyama
    • 1
  • Satoru Fujiwara
    • 1
  • Akira Takahashi
    • 1
  • Akira Ogawa
    • 1
  • Hiroo Sato
    • 1
  • Jiro Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery, Institute of Brain DiseasesTohoku University School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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