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Revascularization Surgery for 50 Patients with Moyamoya Disease

  • Yoku Nakagawa
  • Hiroshi Abe
  • Hiroyasu Kamiyama
  • Yutaka Sawamura
  • Satoshi Gotoh
  • Takeshi Kashiwaba

Abstract

Moyamoya disease is a disease characterized by chronic occlusion of the circle of Willis with subsequent development of fine vascular networks in the ganglionic region and is common in Japanese people. The term “moyamoya” means puff of smoke in Japanese and represents the characteristic angiographic findings of these fine vascular networks. Although reconstructive surgery for moyamoya disease is widely accepted now [1, 2, 5–8], there is still no definite consensus as to surgical indication for patients with hemorrhagic attack [6] and as to selection of operative method for each patient [5–8].

Keywords

Middle Cerebral Artery Dura Mater Operative Method Moyamoya Disease Bone Flap 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoku Nakagawa
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Abe
    • 2
  • Hiroyasu Kamiyama
    • 2
  • Yutaka Sawamura
    • 2
  • Satoshi Gotoh
    • 3
  • Takeshi Kashiwaba
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKushiro Rohsai HospitalKushiroJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryHokkaido University HospitalSapporoJapan
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryAsahikawa Red Cross HospitalAsahikawaJapan
  4. 4.Kashiwaba Neurosurgical HospitalSapporoJapan

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