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Long-Term Operative Results in a Series of 450 Consecutive Anterior Circulation Aneurysms

Relationships Among Operative Timing, Clinical Outcome, and Angiographic Vasospasm
  • Sergio Giombini
  • Carlo L. Solero
  • Antonio Melcarne
  • Stefano Ferraresi
  • Franco Pluchino
Conference paper

Abstract

Focal ischemic deficits are frequently associated with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. They may present as a reversible phenomenon or may be seen as a complete cerebral infarction. The former usually is a consequence of temporary disfunction in the distribution of the vessel harbouring an aneurysm; the latter may vary from a single infarct appropriate to a given vessel to a picture of diffuse patchy areas of infarction covering one or both cerebral hemispheres.

Keywords

Intracranial Aneurysm Cerebral Blood Volume Cerebral Aneurysm Cerebral Vasospasm Anterior Circulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sergio Giombini
    • 1
  • Carlo L. Solero
    • 1
  • Antonio Melcarne
    • 1
  • Stefano Ferraresi
    • 1
  • Franco Pluchino
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryIstituto Neurologico C. BestaMilanItaly

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