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Serodiagnosis of Intestinal Anisakiasis Using Micro-ELISA—Diagnostic Significance of Patients’ IgE

  • S. Takahashi
  • A. Yagihashi
  • N. Sato
  • K. Kikuchi

Abstract

It is known that anisakiasis may develop in patients who have eaten raw fish such as sushi and sashimi, with the Anisakis larvae being the etiological parasite in this disease [1]. It first enters the gastric lumen, then penetrates gastric mucosa, localizing most often in the stomach, though, it can enter the small intestine as well, where the diagnosis is often more difficult [2]. This parasite also produces chronic granulomatous lesions which need to be differentiated from benign or malignant gastro-intestinal tract tumors.

Keywords

Gastric Mucosa Host Immune Response Granulomatous Lesion Gastric Lumen Exact Diagnosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Matthews EB (1984) The source, release and specificity of Anisakis simplex larvae. J Helminth 58: 175–185CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pincus GS, Coolidge C (1975) Intestinal anisakiasis: first case report from north America. Am J Med 59: 114–120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Maizels RM, Phillip M, Ogilvie BM (1982) Molecules on the surface of parasitic nematodes as probes on the immune response in infection. Immunol Rev 61: 109–136PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Takahashi S, Sato N, Ishikura H (1986) Establishment of monoclonal antibodies that discriminate the antigep distribution specifically found in Anisakis larvae (type 1). J Parasit 72: 960–962PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Takahashi
  • A. Yagihashi
  • N. Sato
  • K. Kikuchi

There are no affiliations available

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