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Flow Cytometry

  • R. S. Camplejohn
  • J. C. Macartney

Abstract

Flow cytometry has developed over the past 30 years from initial attempts to count and size particles. The first cell sorter was described in 1965, and multiparameter machines measuring two fluorescence wavelengths were described around 1970. An excellent summary of the historical development of flow cytometers is given by Melamed et al. (1990a).

Keywords

Breast Cancer Flow Cytometry Routine Clinical Application Fresh Tissue Sample Flow Cytometric Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Camplejohn
  • J. C. Macartney

There are no affiliations available

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