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Urban Waterfront Revitalization

  • T. R. Hudspeth

Abstract

This paper provides an historical overview of the rise and fall…and rise again… of waterfronts in American cities. After examining the role of waterfronts in early American history, it traces factors contributing to the decline of urban waterfronts beginning in the late nineteenth century and factors contributing to the rediscovery of waterfronts since the Second World War. Finally, it highlights the importance of citizen participation in planning for revitalization of urban waterfronts.

Keywords

Citizen Participation Coastal Zone Management Citizen Group Landscape Architecture Historic Preservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. R. Hudspeth
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental ProgramUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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