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Intention Model and Coordination for Collective Behavior in Group Robotic System

  • Toshio Fukuda
  • Go Iritani

Abstract

This paper addresses the intention model and its application to an evolution of collective group behavior on decentralized autonomous robotic systems. The decentralized autonomous robotic systems refer to multiple robotic systems including many autonomous robots, such as Cellular Robotic System(CEBOT). The CEBOT, which has been proposed by authors, consists of a number of functional robotic units called “cells.” In the research on the CEBOT same as the decentralized robotic systems, it is one of the most important issues to cooperate among many robots for the group behavior and to coordinate the group behavior, since it is important to organize the behavior of the each robot in the multiple robotic systems. In order to organize the behavior in dynamic environment, we proposed a concept of the “self-recognition” for the decision making of the behavior in a robotic group. In addition to the proposed concept, this paper will show the evolutional group behavior incorporated with the intention model. The concept of the coordination of intention means that each robot coordinate with other robots’ intention in its local aria by communication. Based on this idea, we present the behavioral evolution of the group robotic systems.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Robotic System Group System Group Behavior Autonomous Robot 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshio Fukuda
    • 1
  • Go Iritani
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Mechano-Informatics and SystemsNagoya Univ.NagoyaJapan

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