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Aerobic Work Capacity of Quadriplegics and Exercise Intensity During the Twin-Basketball Game

  • Yukiharu Ikeda
  • Hisakazu Saishoji
  • Takuma Matsumoto
  • Kenji Akiho
  • Yumiko Kunimi
  • Masahiro Hoshi
  • Haruna Araya
  • Masato Mizuguchi
Conference paper

Abstract

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the trainability of quadriplegics in terms of aerobic work capacity, and to investigate physiological exercise intensity during twin-basketball games. Ventilatory profile, alveolar gas exchange, and heart rate (HR) during the maximum effort arm-cranking exercise test was measured for ten male quadriplegic twinbasketball players (trained group) and ten male untrained quadriplegics (untrained group). HR was measured for seven subjects in the trained group during the twin-basketball game. The peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2peak) and peak HR (IIRpeak) during the exercise test were significantly higher in the trained group (14.2 ± 1.9ml/kg/min; 121.7 ± 18.2 bpm) than in the untrained group (10.3 ± 1.5ml/kg/min; 101.5 ± 8.7bpm). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to minute ventilation (V̇E) and ventilatory equivalents for O2 (VE/V̇O2) at V̇O2peak moment. The average HR during twin-basketball games was 112.5 ± 5.7bpm, and the exercise intensity was 86.6 ± 7.9 %HRpeak, and 75.1 ± 11.7 %V̇O2peak. Thus, the trainability of quadriplegics in terms of aerobic work capacity was indicated. It is therefore concluded that twin-basketball is a sports activity that can effectively increase aerobic work capacity in quadriplegics.

Keywords

Exercise Intensity Respiratory Exchange Ratio Trained Group Peak Oxygen Uptake Peak Heart Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukiharu Ikeda
  • Hisakazu Saishoji
  • Takuma Matsumoto
  • Kenji Akiho
  • Yumiko Kunimi
  • Masahiro Hoshi
  • Haruna Araya
  • Masato Mizuguchi

There are no affiliations available

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