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Why Do Lower Limb-Deficient People Have Difficulty in Downhill Walking?—Kinetics of Downhill Versus Level Walking

  • Shinji Sakurai
  • Markus Kuster
  • Graeme A. Wood
Conference paper

Abstract

Downhill walking is a very important type of movement, especially from a clinical viewpoint, because many patients with lower limb deficiency tend to have difficulty during downhill walking rather than level or uphill walking. The purpose of this study was to compare downhill with level walking from a kinetic viewpoint. A new measurement system for joint kinetics of downhill walking was developed for this purpose. Twelve healthy subjects without lower limb or back musculoskeletal pathology were studied. For downhill walking a slope 6 m in length and with a grade of 19.3% was used. Joint kinetic variables such as joint forces, torque, and power were calculated for ankle, knee, and hip joints over the stance phase by combining anthropometric, kinematic, and ground reaction force data in link-segment model for both downhill and level walking. Peak extension torque and power absorption at the knee joint during the early stance phase were 2.2 times and 5.9 times larger for downhill walking (2.60Nm/kgBW, 7.50W/kgBW) than for level walking (1.16Nm/kgBW, 1.27W/kgBW), respectively.

Keywords

Ground Reaction Force Stance Phase Force Platform Level Walking Musculoskeletal Pathology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    Winter DA (1990) Biomechanics and motor control of human movement. Wiley and Sons, New York, pp 75–102Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shinji Sakurai
  • Markus Kuster
  • Graeme A. Wood

There are no affiliations available

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