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Development of Pressure Sores in Active and Inactive Persons with Spinal Cord Injury

  • Masahiro Yamasaki
  • Takashi Komura
  • Kaoru Fujiie
  • Hisato Sasaki
  • Kenji Kai
  • Keisuke Ohdoko
Conference paper

Abstract

To investigate the benefits of sports participation on the prevention of pressure sores, a questionnaire was mailed to 668 men and women with spinal cord injury. The questionnaire was designed to clarify the effects of physical activity and lifestyle on the development of pressure sores. Usable questionnaires were received from 466 persons, representing a response rate of 70%. Thirty-eight percent were quadriplegic and 62% paraplegic, with incomplete injuries accounting for 26% of the combined group. About half of the 466 subjects reported the development of pressure sores during their wheelchair life. There was a clear tendency for the subjects with severe and frequent spasms of their legs to have no pressure sores. Forty percent of the subjects (active subjects) participated in sports regularly, including basketball, tennis, table tennis, swimming, and road racing. When the development of pressure sores for the 5 years before sports participation was compared with the 5-year period after commencement of sports participation, no significant difference was noted. Thus, whether sports participation has a positive benefit in the prevention of pressure sores in paraplegics and quadriplegics could not be determined from the present study.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Sport Participation Skin Blood Flow Usable Questionnaire Table Tennis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiro Yamasaki
  • Takashi Komura
  • Kaoru Fujiie
  • Hisato Sasaki
  • Kenji Kai
  • Keisuke Ohdoko

There are no affiliations available

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