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The Potential for Prevention of the Major Adult Cardiovascular Diseases

  • Jeremiah Stamler

Abstract

This chapter deals with two aspects of the potential for prevention of cardiovascular disease: first, scientific data documenting this potential, emphasizing not high risk, but low risk; and second, public policy issues that relate to achievement of the potential for prevention. There are two aspects to the potential for prevention: one, the scientific foundation, the other, the comprehension of this by political leaders, the public, and the health professions, resulting in the translation of that potential into public policy and finally the implementation of that public policy [1].

Keywords

Serum Cholesterol Dietary Cholesterol Coronary Heart Disease Death Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial Coronary Drug Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1994

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  • Jeremiah Stamler

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