Advertisement

Evidence of Myocardial Raynaud’s Phenomenon in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

  • Yoshio Ishida
  • Akihiro Tani
  • Takakazu Morozuki
  • Chincho Takijiri
  • Hidetoshi Yamagami
  • Kazufumi Kimura
  • Masatsugu Hori
  • Akira Kitabatake
  • Takahiro Kozuka
  • Takenobu Kamada

Abstract

Raynauďs phenomenon and myocardial abnormalities are frequently observed in patients with systemic sclerosis (SS). Recent studies, utilizing thallium-201 (T1-201) myocardial imaging during cold pressor stimulus, have shown reversible impairment of myocardial perfusion in these patients. In this study, we examined whether the impairment of myocardial perfusion during cold stress was linked to Raynaud’s phenomenon in six female patients with SS and diffuse scleroderma (mean age, 44 ± 5 years. Serial thallium-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was performed during dipyridamole infusion (DI) (0.56 mg/kg i.v. for 4 min) and during cold stress (CS) (immersion of the hands into water at 15°C for 2 min) over a 2-week period. Left ventricular T1-201 activity, normalized for millicurie-injected dose, was determined in both studies, and the ratio of activity during CS to that during DI served as an index of the CS-induced change in myocardial perfusion. Within 1 week after the T1-201 studies, contact plate thermography during and after CS was performed and the re-warming time (80% recovery) was determined. All patients showed Raynaud’s phenomenon after exposure to cold, although the severity differed among patients: the re-warming time was in the range of 5–40 min. The T1-201 uptake ratio (CS/DI) was inversely correlated with the re-warming time (r = -0.868, P < 0.05), as shown in the Figure.

Keywords

Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Cold Stress Systemic Sclerosis Uptake Ratio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshio Ishida
  • Akihiro Tani
  • Takakazu Morozuki
    • 1
  • Chincho Takijiri
    • 2
  • Hidetoshi Yamagami
    • 3
  • Kazufumi Kimura
  • Masatsugu Hori
  • Akira Kitabatake
    • 1
  • Takahiro Kozuka
    • 3
  • Takenobu Kamada
    • 1
  1. 1.The First Department of MedicineOsaka University School of MedicineOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of DermatologyOsaka University School of MedicineOsakaJapan
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyOsaka University School of MedicineOsakaJapan

Personalised recommendations