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Cervical Lymph Node Metastases in Thoracic Esophageal Cancer and Their Prognostic Role

  • Masakazu Yoshioka
  • Toshitada Okuma
  • Hirofumi Kaneko
  • Yoshitsugu Torigoe
  • Yoshimasa Miyauchi
Conference paper

Abstract

It is well known that nodal metastasis of the thoracic esophageal cancer occur not only in the mediastinum and abdomen but also in the neck. Therefore, a comprehensive radical operation for the tumor should include a three-field dissection which has been discussed and performed for thoracic esophageal cancer since the 1980s [1, 2]; however, there is no general consensus about its advantages. Of note is that thoracic esophageal cancer with cervical lymph nodal involvement is defined as M1 and classified into stage IV according to the tumor, nodes, metastases (TNM) classification of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), 1987 [3].

Keywords

Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis Thoracic Esophagus Thoracic Esophageal Cancer Thoracic Esophageal Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masakazu Yoshioka
  • Toshitada Okuma
  • Hirofumi Kaneko
  • Yoshitsugu Torigoe
  • Yoshimasa Miyauchi
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of SurgeryKumamoto University Medical SchoolKumamoto City, Kumamoto, 860Japan

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