Advertisement

Assessment of the Surgical Treatment of Reflux Esophagitis Complicated by Esophageal Stricture

  • Nobuyoshi Hanyu
  • Shigeo Morita
  • Yoshiyuki Furukawa
  • Yoichi Ohira
  • Sadanobu Abe
  • Yoshihiro Hashimoto
  • Tetsuya Kajimoto
  • Teruaki Aoki
Conference paper

Abstract

It was some 40 years ago that acid reflux esophagitis associated with hiatus hernia was first reported by Allison et al. [1] in 1951. Since then, reflux esophagitis has been common in the American and European countries, with cases in Japan occurring infrequently. Recently, however, increasing numbers of cases have been diagnosed as reflux esophagitis in Japan due to demographic reasons associated with the aging of society and the westernization of life styles in particular with respect to diet and advances in diagnostic techniques such as esophageal manometry [2], pH monitoring [3], and esophageal scintigraphy [4]. This change of circumstances has caused treatment of the disease to be notably improved: Good results have been reported with histamine H2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors [5, 6]. However, some cases of reflux esophagitis are resistant to these treatments and develop esophageal stricture during the course of the disease.

Keywords

Hiatal Hernia Lower Esophageal Sphincter Reflux Esophagitis Esophageal Stricture Esophageal Manometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Allison PR (1951) Reflux esophagitis, sliding hiatal hernia, and the anatomy of repair. Surg Gynecol Obstet 92: 419PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Morita S, Hanyu N, Aoki T (1991) LES pressure and surgical treatment of achalasia and reflux esophagitis. J Smooth Muscle Res 27: 163–164CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Robertson D (1987) Patterns of acid reflux in complicated oesophagitis. Gut 28: 1483–1488Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fisher RS, Malmud LS, Robert GS. Gastroesophageal (GE) scintiscanning to detect GE reflux. Gastroenterology (1976); 70: 301–308PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Wesdorp ICE (1982) Treatment of reflux oesophagitis. Scand J Gastroenterol 17 [Suppl 79]: 106–13Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kishi S (1992) Pharmacotherapy of reflux esophagitis. Monthly Book Gastro 3: 65–71.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Dent J, Chir B (1976) A new technique for continuous sphincter pressure measurement. Gastroenterology 71: 263–267.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Arndorfer RC, Steff JJ, Dodds WJ (1977) Improved infusion system for intraluminal esophageal manometry. Gastroenterology 73: 23–27.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Nissen R (1961) Gastropexy and fundoplication in surgical treatment of hiatus hernia. Am J Dig Dis 6: 954PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Aoki T, Hanyu N (1990) Surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and its timing. Current Therapy 18: 70–73.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Thai AP (1968) A unified approach to surgical problems of the esophagogastric junction. Ann Surg 168: 542–550.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Aoki T, Hanyu N (1991) Limitations of preservative treatment of reflux esophagitis and application of surgical treatment. Gastroenterol Endosc 3: 49–55.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuyoshi Hanyu
  • Shigeo Morita
  • Yoshiyuki Furukawa
  • Yoichi Ohira
  • Sadanobu Abe
  • Yoshihiro Hashimoto
  • Tetsuya Kajimoto
  • Teruaki Aoki
    • 1
  1. 1.Second Department of SurgeryJikei University School of MedicineMinato-ku, Tokyo, 105Japan

Personalised recommendations