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Investigations of Reoperated Cases of Congenital Disorders of the Esophagus in Children: Reports of Two Cases

  • Hiroo Takehara
  • Nobuhiko Komi
  • Akira Okada
  • Masaharu Nishi
  • Kazuhiro Kameoka
Conference paper

Summary

Two pediatric cases of esophageal atresia, with or without a tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), required secondary surgical intervention to the esophagus because of unexpected or unusual morbidities. Case 1 is an 8-year-old girl who required a reoperation for late recurrence of TEF 8 years after initial surgery at 1 day of age. Case 2 is a male newborn who was operated on at 3 days of age for left diaphragmatic hernia. He also underwent a second surgery 12 days later for lower esophageal atresia associated with a diverticulum-like abscess cavity, in which an abnormal air bubble was misinterpreted as being in the fundus of the herniated stomach. Patient 1 has had an uneventful course since surgery, but patient 2 died at 161 days of age due to severe aspiration pnuemonia caused by gastroesophageal reflux.

Keywords

Esophageal Atresia Tracheoesophageal Fistula Oesophageal Atresia Esophageal Disorder Reoperated Case 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroo Takehara
    • 1
  • Nobuhiko Komi
    • 1
  • Akira Okada
    • 1
  • Masaharu Nishi
    • 1
  • Kazuhiro Kameoka
    • 2
  1. 1.First Department of Surgery, School of MedicineUniversity of TokushimaTokushima, 770Japan
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric SurgeryEhime Prefectural Central HospitalMatsuyama, 790Japan

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