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The Immunological Changes After Operation for Esophageal Cancer and the Effect of Lentinan

  • Satoru Hayashi
  • Masayuki Matsumori
  • Tetsuya Hattori
  • Yoshihisa Watanabe
  • Takashi Koyama
  • Hisao Yoshihara
  • Katsuhiro Sawada
  • Masayoshi Okada
Conference paper

Abstract

It has generally accepted that surgical intervention produces immunodeficiency [1, 2]. Malnutrition is also immunosuppressive [3]. So, in the patient with esophageal cancer, with the presence of preoperative starvation, the host defense mechanism is markedly suppressed by operations which involve intraabdominal and intrathoracic procedures.

Keywords

Natural Killer Esophageal Cancer Natural Killer Activity Immunological Change Blood Leukocyte Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Satoru Hayashi
  • Masayuki Matsumori
  • Tetsuya Hattori
  • Yoshihisa Watanabe
  • Takashi Koyama
  • Hisao Yoshihara
  • Katsuhiro Sawada
  • Masayoshi Okada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Division IIKobe University School of MedicineKusuroku-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, 650Japan

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