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Relationship Between the Esophagus, Trachea, and Pleura

  • D. Liebermann-Meffert
  • W. Huber
  • B. Häberle
  • L. J. Wurzinger
  • J. R. Siewert

Abstract

The location in a loose areolar connective tissue bed permits esophageal mobility within the mediastinum during swallows and respiration [1]. In general, it also allows the esophagus to be bluntly stripped from the mediastinum without any hazard during blunt transdiaphragmatic esophagectomy [2–6]. However, tracheal and pleural tears or tracheoesophageal fistula formation have repeatedly complicated blunt dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and irradiation [7], This event may be due to pathological adhesions, on the other hand it also may be based on normal anatomical structures attaching the esophagus to its neighboring tissue.

Keywords

Cricoid Cartilage Posterior Mediastinum Tracheal Bifurcation Fiber Strand Normal Anatomical Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Liebermann-Meffert
    • 1
  • W. Huber
    • 1
  • B. Häberle
    • 2
  • L. J. Wurzinger
    • 2
  • J. R. Siewert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryTechnical University of Munich, Technische Universität Klinikum rechts der IsarMünchen 80Germany
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyTechnical University of Munich, Technische Universität Klinikum rechts der IsarMünchen 80Germany

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