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Posterior Stabilization for Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis: In Situ Fusion in Maximum Extension on Hall’s Frame

  • Osamu Nakai
  • Isakichi Yamaura
  • Yoshiro Kurosa
  • Hiromichi Komori
  • Atsushi Ookawa
  • Hiroshi Sakai
  • Masahiro Abe

Abstract

The most common form of spinal deformity in Japan, especially in rural areas, was coined lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) by Takemistu et al. [1], from among the various types of kyphosis that have been recognized and investigated [2]. LDK had not been delineated regarding pathology and treatment, simply because this spinal deformity has historically been viewed as a result of the inevitable aging process. The pathology of this disease thus remains unknown and treatment remains undetermined. On the other hand, the everyday disabilities of patients with LDK are much more severe than those who are healthy can imagine; even essential daily activities such as standing and walking are seriously affected by LDK. The solution of this problem is therefore a natural target of study for Japanese spinal surgeons.

Keywords

Thoracic Kyphosis Lumbar Fusion Posterior Stabilization Extension Position Fusion Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Osamu Nakai
  • Isakichi Yamaura
  • Yoshiro Kurosa
  • Hiromichi Komori
  • Atsushi Ookawa
  • Hiroshi Sakai
  • Masahiro Abe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryKudanzaka HospitalChiyoda-ku, TokyoJapan

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