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Abstract

Numerical modeling based on chemical kinetics is a powerful technique for the analysis of many combustion phenomena including turbulent diffusion combustion, as is reviewed from time to time [1].

Keywords

Shock Tube Heat Release Rate Ignition Delay Elementary Reaction Laminar Flame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • S. Koda

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