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Protein Separation in the Medium of Organic Solvent by High Electrical Potential

  • Joong Kon Park
  • Joon Kyun Kim
Conference paper

Abstract

Proteins are the macromolecules containing the biological functions and can be separated by the conventional methods such as sedimentation, filtration, chromatography, electrophoresis and biological affinity [1]. Proteins migrate in an electrical field because of the electrical charges they possess in an aqueous solution. The migration speed of proteins depends on electrical charges of proteins to be separated and the applied voltage between the two plates. The application of high voltage is limited by the heat generation in the aqueous solution. The migration speed of proteins depends on electrical charges of proteins to be separated and the applied voltage between the two plates. The application of high voltage is limited by the heat generation in the aqueous solution. And Haber employed successfully non-aqueous high voltage system in separating organic dyes and called this method as electromolecular propulsion[2]. We can use an organic solvent as a medium instead of buffer solution to minimize heat generation and increase the moving velocity of protein at high applied voltages in the conventional electrophoresis reactor. The effect of organic solvent used as the medium on the activity of proteins was negligible [3]. The activity was protected by the organic solvent for the case that the protein was solved in the acid buffer solution. Although the medium of buffer solution in the electrophoresis cell can be changed with organic solvent, protein should be solved in an aqueous solution to take the electrical charges. In this study we wanted to investigate the mechanism of protein migration in the medium of organic solvent and mode of protein movement.

Keywords

Electrical Charge Heat Generation Propylene Glycol Protein Solution Propylene Carbonate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Yamamoto S, Nomura M, Sano Y (1987) Adsorption chromatography of proteins — determination of optimum conditions, AIChE J. 33: 1426CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Haber N (1982) Chemoelectronic mobilization of chemical species in low conductivity fluids — new electrokinetic effects, Biochem. J. 79: 272–276Google Scholar
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    Hong H C, Ryu W K, Park J K, Song B H (1991) Protein transport by the paper electrophoresis in organic solvent medium, KIChE J. 29: 457–462Google Scholar
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    Landua A J, Awapara J (1949) Use of modified ninhydrin reagent in quantitative determination of amino acids by paper chromatography, Science 109: 385–386PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Yezawa M (1968) Polyelectrolytes, Kagaku Shokan 37: 7Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joong Kon Park
    • 1
  • Joon Kyun Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringKyungpook National UniversitySankyuk-dong, TaeguKorea

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