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The LEC Rat pp 30-40 | Cite as

Pathological and Laboratory Findings of “LEC/Otk” Rats Maintained Under SPF Conditions

  • Kazuya Kawano
  • Tsukasa Hirashima
  • Shigehito Mori
  • Sumio Bando
  • Kenichi Yonemoto
  • Fumiko Abe
  • Hirohiko Goto
  • Takashi Natori

Abstract

A mutant strain of rats, LEC, that develops spontaneous hepatic injury associated with severe jaundice was developed in 1987 [1]. In this LEC strain, isolated and established as an inbred strain by sibmating, almost 90% of the animals show hereditary hepatic injury in conventional conditions [2, 3]. Genetic analysis indicated that at least one autosomal recessive gene is responsible for this disease [4]. Thus, the LEC strain is a useful model for studies on liver cell injury and liver cancer. Hepatocellular carcinomas have been found in LEC rats surviving for a long time after recovery from jaundice [2, 5]. Hepatocellular carcinomas were also found in all cases in the present study, as will be reported in detail (Chap. III. p. 2).

Keywords

None None Immunological Disorder Liver Cell Necrosis Severe Jaundice Autosomal Recessive Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuya Kawano
  • Tsukasa Hirashima
  • Shigehito Mori
  • Sumio Bando
  • Kenichi Yonemoto
  • Fumiko Abe
  • Hirohiko Goto
  • Takashi Natori
    • 1
  1. 1.Tokushima Research InstituteOtsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.TokushimaJapan

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