Advertisement

Peripheral-Type Benzodiazepine Receptors in Gliomas

  • Akira Takada
  • Yukitaka Ushio
  • Mirko Diksic
  • Y. Lucas Yamamoto

Abstract

Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) are present in high concentrations in peripheral tissues of various organs, such as lung, kidney, heart, and adrenal gland, but are sparse in the normal nervous system [1]. PBRs are thought to be located on glia rather than on neurons [2]. Moreover, PBRs have been found in rodent glial tumors [3] as well as in human glial tumors, and several studies suggested that PBRs could be useful for specific imaging of glial tumors. Black et al. [4] reported that a significant correlation was observed between the high binding of PBR ligands and the degree of malignancy in gliomas in man, but Ferrarese et al. [5] reported that the binding density of PBR ligands did not correlate with malignancy. The main purpose of this study was to try to add more light to this problem by examining the concentration (Bmax) and dissociation constant (K d ) for PBRs in human gliomas.

Keywords

Malignant Glioma Human Glioma Glial Tumor Scatchard Analysis Binding Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Anholt RR, De Souza EB, Oster-Granite ML, Snyder SH (1985) Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors: Autoradiographic localization in whole body sections of neonatal rats. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 233: 517–520Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    McCarthy KD, Harden TK (1981) Indentification of two benzodiazepine biding sites on cells cultured from rat cerebral cortex. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 216: 183–191PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Starosta-Rubinstein S, Ciliax B, Penny JB, McKeever P, Young AB (1987) Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84: 891–895PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Black KL, Ikezaki K, Toga AW (1989) Imaging of brain tumors using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands. J Neurosurg 71: 113–118PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ferrarese C, Appollonio I, Frigo M, Gaini M, Piolti R, Frattola L (1989) Benzodiazepine receptors and diazepine binding inhibitor in human cerebral tumors. Ann Neurol 26: 564–568PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Olson JMM, Junck L, Young AB, Penny JB, Mancini WR (1988) Isoquinoline and peripheral-type benzodiazepine in gliomas: Implication for diagnostic imaging. Cancer Res 48: 5837–5741PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Junck L, Olson JMM, Ciliax BJ, Koeppe RA, Watkins GL, Jewett DM, McKeever PE, Wieland DM, Kilbourn MR, Starosta-Rubinstein S, Mancini WR, Kühl DE, Greenberg HS, Young AB (1989) PET imaging of human gliomas with ligands for the peripheral bezodiazepine binding site. Ann Neurol 26: 752–758PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gildersleeve DL, Lin T-Y, Wieland DM, Ciliax BJ, Olson JMM, Young AB (1989) Synthesis of a high activity [125I]-labelled analog of PK 11195, a potential agent for SPECT imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Nucl Med Biol 16: 423–429Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Van Dort ME, Ciliax BJ, Gildersleeve DL, Sherman PS, Rosenspire KC, Young AB, Junck L, Wieland DM (1988) Radioiodinated benzodiazepines: Agents for mapping glial tumors. J Med Chem 31: 2081–2086PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Black KL, Ikezaki K, Santori E, Becher DP, Vinters HV (1990) Specific high-affinity binding of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands to brain tumors in rat and man. Cancer 65: 93–97PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Takada
    • 1
  • Yukitaka Ushio
    • 1
  • Mirko Diksic
    • 2
  • Y. Lucas Yamamoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKumamoto University Medical SchoolKumamoto, 862Japan
  2. 2.Cone Neurological Research Labolatory and Neuroisotope LaboratoryMontreal Neurological InstituteMontrealCanada

Personalised recommendations