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Murine Models with Leptomeningeal Dissemination of Human Medulloblastoma Cells

  • Keiji Shimizu
  • Masanobu Yamada
  • Kazuyoshi Tamura
  • Syusuke Moriuchi
  • Eiichiro Mabuchi
  • Kae Chang Park
  • Yasuyoshi Miyao
  • Toru Hayakawa

Abstract

The 5-year survival rate of patients with medulloblastoma has improved as much as 70% in the past 15 years. This dramatic improvement is mainly due to advances in radiotherapy [1–3]. Although medulloblastomas are certainly radiosensitive, they are not always radiocurable because of limited irradiation dosages and adverse effects on the whole neural axis. Sooner or later, tumor regrowth takes place, and the meningeal dissemination of the tumor cells then results in the demise of most patients with medulloblastoma [4].

Keywords

Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Tumor Inoculation Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cell Leptomeningeal Dissemination Human Medulloblastoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keiji Shimizu
  • Masanobu Yamada
  • Kazuyoshi Tamura
  • Syusuke Moriuchi
  • Eiichiro Mabuchi
  • Kae Chang Park
  • Yasuyoshi Miyao
  • Toru Hayakawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryOsaka University Medical SchoolOsaka, 553Japan

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