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The Influence of MHC Class I Expression on the Growth of a Glioblastoma Cell Line

  • Nobuaki Momozaki
  • Kazuo Tabuchi
  • Mamoru Oh-uchida
  • Kiyonobu Ikezaki
  • Tatsumi Hirotsu
  • Katsuji Hori

Abstract

MHC class I complex genes constitute a highly polymorphic gene family which encodes transmembrane glycoproteins. They consist of a 45,000 dalton integral membrane protein noncovalently associated with the 12,000 dalton polypeptide, β2 microglobulin. MHC class I complex molecules appear to play an essential role in the presentation of tumor-specific antigens to the host’s immune system (reviewed in [1]). Recently, other roles of MHC class I have been documented, such as signal transduction and glucose transport. In the present experiment, we examined the influence of MHC class I expression on the growth of human glioma cells. We constructed a dexamethasone-inducible mouse MHC class I and introduced it into a human glioblastoma cell. Using this dexamethasone-inducible MHC class I-glioblastoma cell system, the influence of the expression of mouse MHC class I on anchorage-independent cell growth was compared between MHC class I expressing and non-expressing states.

Keywords

Soft Agar Human Glioblastoma Cell Human Glioblastoma Cell Line Sagum Medical School Murine Mammary Tumor Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuaki Momozaki
    • 1
  • Kazuo Tabuchi
    • 1
  • Mamoru Oh-uchida
    • 2
  • Kiyonobu Ikezaki
    • 1
  • Tatsumi Hirotsu
    • 1
  • Katsuji Hori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgerySaga Medical SchoolSaga, 849Japan
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistrySaga Medical SchoolSaga, 849Japan

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