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Loss of Heterozygosity of Chromosomes 10 and 17 in Human Malignant Astrocytomas

  • Kouichi Tokuda
  • Miri Fujita
  • Kazuo Nagashima
  • Hiroshi Abe
  • Toshimitsu Aida
  • Shinji Sugimoto
  • Yutaka Sawamura
  • Mitsuhiro Tada

Abstract

Astrocytomas are the most common tumors of the human central nervous system. Tumors of this type can be classified into four histopathologic grades of malignancy according to Kernohan [1]. Glioblastoma (astrocytoma grade IV) is always lethal despite surgery, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy. Low-grade or anaplastic astrocytomas vary in their response to treatment. However, a recurrent tumor is often less well differentiated, suggesting that astrocytoma can be a progressive disease. It is now believed that the genes responsible for tumorigenesis are recessive oncogenes.

Keywords

Glioblastoma Multiforme Anaplastic Astrocytoma Histopathologic Grade Human Central Nervous System Astrocytoma Grade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kouichi Tokuda
    • 1
  • Miri Fujita
    • 2
  • Kazuo Nagashima
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Abe
    • 1
  • Toshimitsu Aida
    • 1
  • Shinji Sugimoto
    • 1
  • Yutaka Sawamura
    • 1
  • Mitsuhiro Tada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Hokkaido School of MedicineSapporo, 060Japan
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of Hokkaido School of MedicineSapporo, 060Japan

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