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Glutathione S-Transferase Placental Form in Human and Rat Gliomas and Its Possible Role in Drug Resistance

  • Akira Hara
  • Noboru Sakai
  • Shuji Niikawa
  • Hiroshi Hirayama
  • Hiromu Yamada
  • Takuji Tanaka
  • Hideki Mori

Abstract

Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of the detoxifying enzymes catalyzing the conjugation of glutathione to a wide variety of hydrophobic electrophilic substances [1]. GSTs have various isoenzymes which have been studied extensively in rats [2]. The isozyme, rat placental form (GST-P) has been shown to be a marker for preneoplastic or neoplastic lesions in chemical hepatocarcinogenesis [3], GST-P is well recognized to exist in normal rat astrocytes, and is regarded as a major form of isozymes expressed in rat brain [4]. GST-P is expressed in GST-P-negative rat glioma cells after induction of benign transformation by dibutyryladenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate [5]. The human placental form of GST (GST-π), which is closely related to GST-P immunologically, is also contained in normal human astrocytes. It may be that the GST-π; or GST-P contained in normal astrocytes is concerned with the detoxifying function against xenobiotics for the protection of neurons from their toxic effects. We have already demonstrated the expression of GST-π in human gliomas [6].

Keywords

Glioma Cell Human Glioma Preneoplastic Lesion Human Glioma Cell Line Anaplastic Glioma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Hara
  • Noboru Sakai
  • Shuji Niikawa
  • Hiroshi Hirayama
  • Hiromu Yamada
  • Takuji Tanaka
  • Hideki Mori
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neurosurgery and PathologyGifu University School of MedicineGifu, 500Japan

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