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Studies of Active Oxygen Species in Brain Tumors

  • Masahiro Kurisaka
  • Kunihiro Nakai
  • Makoto Arimitsu
  • Koreaki Mori
  • Yukie Niwa

Abstract

Many factors, such as viral infection, irradiation, chemical substances, and others, are present as promoters of cancer. These factors act upon deoxynucleic acid (DNA) of normal cells and thereby induce cancer [1,2]. Among these factors, viruses act directly on the DNA, but radiation beams and chemical agents create a large amount of active oxygen species in the cytoplasm of the cells and the surplus active oxygen species produce the cancer due to their effect on DNA. We measured superoxide dismutase (SOD) [3], catalase, and lipidperoxidase in brain tumors, gliosis, and normal brain tissue, which were obtained by lobectomy with removal of the tumor. We compared the active oxygen species, and the anti-oxidization enzyme in malignant and benign brain tumors in order to determine the differences in metabolism or the mechanism of tumor growth in such tumors.

Keywords

White Matter Brain Tumor Gray Matter Benign Tumor Anaplastic Astrocytoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masahiro Kurisaka
    • 1
  • Kunihiro Nakai
    • 1
  • Makoto Arimitsu
    • 1
  • Koreaki Mori
    • 1
  • Yukie Niwa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKochi Medical SchoolNangoku, 783Japan
  2. 2.Niwa Immunological InstituteTosashimizuJapan

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