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A Preliminary Report on the Use of Nucleolar Organizer Regions (NORs) Counting for Improved Surgical Resection of Glioblastomas

  • Hideichi Takayama
  • Yuichi Hirose
  • Masahiro Toda
  • Yukiteru Nakano
  • Takeshi Kawase
  • Mitsuhiro Otani
  • Yoshihiro Ogawa
  • Shigeo Toya

Abstract

Since 1982 we have tried gross total removal of gliomas when the tumor appeared as a circumscribed lesion on preoperative CT or MRI scans, using intraoperative histopathological examinations of the marginal to determine the extent of the excision. However, it is sometimes difficult to detect tumor cells among normal brain parenchyma by means of routine histological procedures. Recently, nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), chromosomal segments which transcribe to ribosomal RNA, could be visualized by a simple silver-staining method, and the number and/or intranuclear distribution of NORs have been found to be related to malignancy in gliomas [1,2]. Assessment of the number of NORs may reflect cellular activity and, possibly, proliferation, and make it possible to distinguish isolated glioma cells for normal or reactive glial elements.

Keywords

Tumor Cell Invasion Nucleolar Organizer Region Complete Tumor Removal Marginal Tissue Detect Tumor Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideichi Takayama
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yuichi Hirose
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masahiro Toda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yukiteru Nakano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takeshi Kawase
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mitsuhiro Otani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoshihiro Ogawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shigeo Toya
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, School of MedicineKeio UniversityShinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160Japan
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, Minami-Tama HospitalSaitama Children’s Medical CenterIwatsuki, 339Japan

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