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Electrophysiological Aspects of Surgically-Induced Endolymphatic Hydrops

  • Jun Kusakari
  • Zenya Ito
  • Norihide Nishikawa
  • Minoru Takeyama
  • Yasuo Furuhashi
  • Akira Hara
  • Tetsuaki Kawase
  • Kenji Ohyama
  • Toshimitsu Kobayashi
  • Eiichi Arakawa
  • Masaaki Rokugo

Abstract

Endolymphatic hydrops, a characteristic finding in Ménière’s disease can be induced in guinea pigs by surgical obliteration of the endolymphatic duct and sac. Since the reports by Harada [1], Naito [2], and Kimura [3], this hydropic animal has frequently been used as an animal model of Ménière’s disease. The purpose of the present paper is to summarize the results of our 10-year study on these animals [4–9] and to review the recently published articles by other investigators. In the present study, endolymphatic hydrops was induced in 136 albino guinea pigs by obliterating the endolymphatic duct and sac. The presence of the hydrops was histologically confirmed in a majority of the cases (Fig. 5.1). The endolymphatic potential (EP) was recorded through the round window and the recording electrode for other cochlear potentials was placed at the round window. The sound stimuli were clicks generated by a 90 μs rectangular pulse and tone bursts of 0.5–16 kHz with a 1 ms rise-fall time and a 10 ms duration. Similar methods were used in the majority of the reports reviewed in the present paper. Therefore, the methods or the conditions of the experiments used elsewhere will be described only when they differ from ours.

Keywords

Outer Hair Cell Round Window Compound Action Potential Threshold Shift Tone Burst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Kusakari
  • Zenya Ito
  • Norihide Nishikawa
  • Minoru Takeyama
  • Yasuo Furuhashi
  • Akira Hara
  • Tetsuaki Kawase
  • Kenji Ohyama
  • Toshimitsu Kobayashi
  • Eiichi Arakawa
  • Masaaki Rokugo

There are no affiliations available

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