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Management of Femoral Bone Stock Deficiency in Total Hip Replacement

  • Hugh P. Chandler

Summary

Forty-three femoral grafts were used to reconstruct femoral deficiency in revision total hip replacement. Allografts were used in the majority of cases but were always supplemented by autograft. Grafts were used to reconstruct deficiencies of the calcar, cortical perforation, fractures about or below the stem of the femoral component and for massive proximal deficiency of the metaphysis and diaphysis of the femur. These reconstructions were major procedures and complications were significant but comparable to those described for other revision surgery. The infection rate was 5.4%

Keywords

Femoral Component Femoral Graft Allograft Strut Femoral Deficiency Cortical Strut 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh P. Chandler
    • 1
  1. 1.Ambulatory Care CenterMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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