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Deteriorating Defense Mechanism for Bacterial Infection and High Incidence of Endotoxemia in Surgical Patients Developing MOF

  • Masaru Ishiyama
  • Chiyuki Watanabe
  • Takashi Ichikura
  • Kojiro Kuroiwa
  • Satoru Inoue
  • Takeyuki Hiramatsu
  • Yasuhiko Morioka

Abstract

Multiple organ failure (MOF), a clinical concept first reported by Tilney et al. [1], is a critical state in which the function of vital organs or physiological systems progressively or sequentially deteriorates during hemodialysis for patients with acute renal failure following surgery for a ruptured abdominal aneurysm. Baue [2], Eiseman et al. [3], Fry et al. [4], and others describe similar pathophysiological sequelae which appear in various critically ill patients, including subjects who have undergone gastrointestinal surgery. These authors coincidentally emphasize that most MOF cases are accompanied by severe bacterial infection and that the mortality of MOF is extremely high.

Keywords

Multiple Organ Failure Fresh Freeze Plasma Subtotal Gastrectomy Subtotal Esophagectomy Normal Human Plasma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaru Ishiyama
  • Chiyuki Watanabe
  • Takashi Ichikura
  • Kojiro Kuroiwa
  • Satoru Inoue
  • Takeyuki Hiramatsu
  • Yasuhiko Morioka
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of Surgery, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113Japan

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