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Changes in Cerebral Regional Blood Flow and Tissue Oxygen Tension During Hemorrhagic Shock and Post-Cerebral Circulatory Arrest

  • Kazuo Okada
  • Otowa Moritsune
  • Yoshimori Kikuta
  • Kenzo Kajiyama
  • Hiroaki Kawabata
  • Shinkichi Tezuka

Abstract

Tissue PO2 may be defined as an indicator of the changes in regional blood flow and tissue metabolic rate for oxygen. In metabolically stable tissue, tissue PO2 (PtO2) is primarily determined by the local tissue blood flow. It is well recognized that in the brain, the blood flow is maintained by an autoregulatory mechanism, even during hypotension. With the progression of shock, this mechanism may deteriorate.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Mean Arterial Pressure Hemorrhagic Shock Cerebral Regional Blood Flow Regional Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuo Okada
  • Otowa Moritsune
  • Yoshimori Kikuta
  • Kenzo Kajiyama
  • Hiroaki Kawabata
  • Shinkichi Tezuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyTeikyo University School of MedicineItabashi-ku, Tokyo, 173Japan

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