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Blood Pressure in Mesenteric Microvessels of Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats: Application of a Servo-Nulling Micropressure System

  • Sotaro Hanai
  • Hideyuki Niimi
  • Yasuyuki Nishio
  • Takuji Suzaki

Abstract

It is of physiological importance to measure directly the pressure in in vivo microvessels since this may reflect the hemodynamic nature in the microvascular network. A number of techniques have been proposed for the direct measurement of microvascular pressure, but a servo-nulling technique [1] has been commonly used because it can provide accurate information about the microhemodynamics. In fact, this method has made it possible to measure blood pressure at a particular point in the microvascular network and to measure unsteady micropressure because of its high-frequency response capability. According to various reports, the response frequency ranges from 0 to 20–60 Hz [1–4]. In this paper, applications of the servo-nulling method to the microvasculature of normotensive and hypertensive rats are investigated.

Keywords

Capillary Pressure Microvascular Network Glass Micropipette External Fluid Hydrostatic Pressure Gradient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sotaro Hanai
    • 1
  • Hideyuki Niimi
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Nishio
    • 2
  • Takuji Suzaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Vascular PhysiologyNational Cardiovascular Center Research InstituteSuita, Osaka. 565Japan
  2. 2.Tateisi Institute of Life SciencesUkyo-ku, Kyoto, 616Japan

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