Advertisement

Microcirculation of Canine Hindlimbs in Hemorrhagic Hypotension

  • Toshio Ozeki
  • Hiroshi Kumazaki
  • Y. Kohketsu
  • T. Okada
  • S. Hirakawa

Abstract

We have previously studied the changes in the diffusion capacity for 22NaCl and 86RbCl in the hindlimbs of dogs with and without acute hemorrhagic hypotension [1–3]. The diffusion capacity is defined as the product of P and S, where P is the permeability coefficient and S is the surface area. The diffusion capacity is measured by the “indicator diffusion” method. We found that acutely induced hemorrhagic hypotension decreased the diffusion capacity [4].

Keywords

Diffusion Capacity Extracorporeal Circuit Beta Blockade Microvascular Blood Flow Exchange Vessel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Imao T (1971) The influence of elevated venous pressure on blood-tissue exchange of 22Na in perfused hindlimbs of dogs. Jpn Circ J 35: 1–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Yoshimura T (1972) Influence of venous congestion on the blood-tissue exchange of 22Na in dog’s hindlimbs with special reference to the role of the autonomic nervous system. Jpn Circ J 36: 1047–1055 (in Japanese)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sato E, Kida K, Yokoyamah, Hirakawa S (1983) Redistribution of the blood flow in the microvascular beds of skeletal muscle of dogs during acute venous congestion of a hindlimbs. Acta Scholae Medicinalis Universitatis in Gifu 31: 708–724 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sato M, Ozeki T, Kumazaki H, Hirakawa S (1986) Effect of acute hemorrhagic hypotension on the blood flow in the microvascular beds of skeletal muscles of dog’s hindlimbs. Acta Scholae Medicinalis Universitatis in Gifu 34: 1–14 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kida K, Sato E, Yokoyama H, Hirakawa S (1980) Quantitative study on the blood flow density in microcirculatory beds of the striated muscle. Acta Scholae Medicinalis Universitatis in Gifu 28: 18–29 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Yokoyama H, Kida K, Sato E, Hirakawa S (1983) The effect of acute hemorrhagic hypotension on blood flow density in cicrocirculatory beds of the striated muscle of dog’s hindlimbs. Acta Scholae Medicinalis Universitatis in Gifu 31: 290–303 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Crone C (1970) Capillary permeability-techniques and problems. In: Crone C, Lassen NA (eds) Alfred Benzon symposium II: Capillary permeability. Munksgaard, Copenhagen, pp 15–31Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Crone C (1963) The permeability of capillaried in various organs as determined by use of the ‘indicator diffusion’ method. Acta Physiol Scand 58: 292–305PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Renkin EM (1969) Exchange of substances through capillary walls. In: Wolstenholme GEW, Knight AB (eds) Circulatory and respiratory mass transport, a Ciba foundation symposium. Churchill, London, pp 50–66Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Renkin EM (1968) Transcapillary exchange in relation to capillary circulation. In: Biological interfaces: flows and exchanges. Little Brown, Boston pp 96–108Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Renkin EM (1965) Blood flow and transcapillary exchange in skeletal muscle. Federation Proc 24: 1092–1094Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Plyley MJ, Groom AC (1975) Geometrical disturbance of capillaries in mammalian striated mescle. Am J Physiol 228: 1376–1383PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Landis EM, Pappenheimer JR (1963) In: Handbook of physiology, sect. 2, vol. 2. Am Physiol Society, Washington pp 961–1034Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshio Ozeki
  • Hiroshi Kumazaki
  • Y. Kohketsu
  • T. Okada
  • S. Hirakawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Second Department of Internal MedicineGifu University School of MedicineGifu, 500Japan

Personalised recommendations