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Cysts

Trichilemmal cyst (Pinkus)
  • Kinya Ishikawa

Abstract

Trichilemmal cysts occur most frequently on the scalp. Histologically, the cyst shows the same keratinization as that of the isthmus zone of the anagen hair follicle (Figs. 18, 19) or trichilemmal sac of the catagen and telogen hair (Fig. 26). In some cases, both epidermoid and trichilemmal keratinization patterns are seen in a cyst. Such cysts were termed “hybrid cysts” by Brownstein [1].

Keywords

Cyst Wall Dermoid Cyst Fibrous Sheath Keratohyaline Granule Sebaceous Cyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Brownstein MH, Helwig EB (1973) Subcutaneous dermoid cysts. Arch Dermatol 107: 237–239PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kinya Ishikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyKasumigaura National HospitalTsuchiura 300Japan

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