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An Energetic Analysis of Myocardial Performance

  • J. Scott Rankin
  • Joseph R. Elbeery
  • John C. Lucke
  • William Gaynor
  • David H. Harpole
  • Michael P. Feneley
  • Srdjan Nikolić
  • George W. Maier
  • George S. TysonJr.
  • Craig O. Olsen
  • Donald D. Glower

Summary

Cardiovascular dynamics is one of the oldest lines of medical research, having its origins in the work of William Harvey in the seventeenth century. Yet despite its long history, conceptual understanding of cardiac performance is advancing more rapidly than ever, and many different scientifc approaches are currently yielding exciting new insights. This chapter reviews 15 years of work from our laboratories at Duke University on the quantitative assessment of diastolic and systolic ventricular function. Our approach to the analysis of chamber geometry, ventricular interaction, and diastolic mechanical properties is described, leading to the observation of a fundamentally linear relationship between myocardial energy production (net external work) and end diastolic fiber length. This relationship is further validated and expanded to provide a useful estimate of myocardial inotropism that is applicable to pathophysiologic analysis of myocardial ischemia and hypertrophy. Finally, recent extensions of this technique to human studies have proven useful to the understanding of cardiopulmonary interactions and valvular heart disease. As knowledge of myocardial adaptive mechanisms improves, enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities could translate into significant advances in patient care.

Keywords

Ventricular Pressure Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Stroke Work Myocardial Performance Intact Heart 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Scott Rankin
  • Joseph R. Elbeery
  • John C. Lucke
  • William Gaynor
  • David H. Harpole
  • Michael P. Feneley
  • Srdjan Nikolić
  • George W. Maier
  • George S. TysonJr.
  • Craig O. Olsen
  • Donald D. Glower
    • 1
  1. 1.The Department of SurgeryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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