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Indicators

  • Japan Environmental Council
  • Takehisa Awaji
  • Shun’ichi Teranishi
Part of the The State of Environment in Asia book series (STEA)

Abstract

Even among fellow Asian countries there are wide differences in material lifestyles between high-income countries like Japan and developing countries like India. The Material World Project’s Material world: A Global Family Portrait (Sierra Club Books, 1994) uses photographs to describe the families, possessions like furniture, and homes that are considered standard in 30 countries. Major differences in the way people live are evident in the contrast between the homes in countries like Japan, which are overflowing with material possessions, and the homes in developing countries, which have few. People in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, which have succeeded in industrializing, are surrounded by durable consumer goods — indeed, appliances such as refrigerators and color televisions are found in nearly every home. At least 70% of all Japanese households possess the following durable consumer goods: refrigerators, microwave ovens, washing machines, vacuum cleaners, sewing machines, room air conditioners, color TVs, VCRs, touch-tone telephones, passenger cars, bicycles, and cameras.

Keywords

Clean Development Mechanism Rubber Tree Musk Deer Occupational Accident Durable Consumer Good 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Japan Environmental Council
  • Takehisa Awaji
    • 1
  • Shun’ichi Teranishi
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of LawRikkyo UniversityToshima-ku, TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of EconomicsHitotsubashi UniversityKunitachi-shi, TokyoJapan

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