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Computational Analysis for Mechanical Functions of Left Ventricle

  • Yutaka Sawaki
  • Tadashi Inaba
  • Kazuo Yagi
  • Kiyotsugu Sekioka
  • Masataka Tokuda

Summary

A numerical simulation system using the three-dimensional finite element method (3D-FEM) is established to reproduce the performance of the left ventricle during one cardiac cycle, which may ultimately provide useful information for medical diagnoses. The simulation system consists of a 3D-FEM mechanical model of the left ventricle based on four fundamental models, that is, (1) a mechanical model of myocardial muscle fiber which produces the active force, (2) a mechanical model of the left ventricle which is composed of the myocardial muscle fiber, (3) a transmission model of electric stimulus, and (4) a circulatory system model which gives the pre-and after-loads to the left ventricular model. In this chapter, the fundamental system of the simulator is explained, and some typical examples of computational results obtained by this system are shown and discussed. The reliability of the simulator is examined by comparing some numerical results with the corresponding results obtained by medical imaging technique.

Keywords

Left Ventricle Electric Stimulus Sarcomere Length Fiber Angle Aortic Compliance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yutaka Sawaki
    • 1
  • Tadashi Inaba
    • 1
  • Kazuo Yagi
    • 1
  • Kiyotsugu Sekioka
    • 2
  • Masataka Tokuda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringMie UniversityTsuJapan
  2. 2.Department of MedicineMie UniversityTsuJapan

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