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Numerical Simulation of Co-operative Regulation in the Cerebral Microvascular Arcadal Network

  • Hideyuki Niimi
  • Yutaka Komai
  • Saburo Yamaguchi

Summary

Biomathematical models for cat cerebral arteriolar network were developed for numerical evaluation of the significance of arcadal structure in the cerebral microvascular hemodynamics. Heterogeneous distribution of hematocrit and mutual co-operation in the flow regulation in the arcadal network were demonstrated using the numerical simulation.

Keywords

Microvascular Network Daughter Branch Vascular Diameter Daughter Vessel Microvascular Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hideyuki Niimi
    • 1
  • Yutaka Komai
    • 1
  • Saburo Yamaguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Vascular PhysiologyNational Cardiovascular Center Research InstituteSuita, OsakaJapan

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