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Object Transport Using Multiple Mobile Robots with Pin Joint Endeffectors

  • Chad K. Humberstone
  • Kevin B. Smith
Chapter

Abstract

This paper presents the mechanical design and control policy for a set of robots used to carry a solid object. Contributions in our approach include a mechanical design that does not require compliance and is simple and inexpensive to manufacture. All the robots receive the same commands from a supervisor, and no communication is required between robots. Feedforward and feedback linearization using force and acceleration inputs is employed to produce a point with linear motion on the nonholonomic robots. Acceleration feedback is used on the wheel accelerations. The control has been validated using simulations, and the mechanical design and control policy have been validated experimentally.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Feedback Linearization Reference Trajectory Robot Hand Acceleration Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chad K. Humberstone
    • 1
  • Kevin B. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Brigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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