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Are Soils in Degraded Dipterocarp Forest Ecosystems Deteriorated? A Comparison of Imperata Grasslands, Degraded Secondary Forests, and Primary Forests

  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Kazuhito Morisada
  • Nagaharu Tanaka
  • Yoshiyuki Kiyono
  • Syarif Effendi
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 140)

Abstract

Many primary forests in the tropical regions of the world have been converted into degraded secondary forests and grasslands of species such asImperata cylindrica.The main destructive agents responsible include illegal logging, slash-and-burn cultivation, extensive cattle grazing and natural forest fires (Fatawi and Mori, Chapter 1, this volume). Understanding the soil characteristics of these degraded forest ecosystems is important not only for the conversion of these areas into more productive land but also for evaluating the effects of forest degradation on global climatic change. However, information on the soils of degraded ecosystems is very scarce and many theories on the soil fertility ofImperatagrasslands are still under debate. For instance, it has been reported that in the Philippines degraded grassland soils are severely eroded, extremely acidic, low in organic matter and lacking in key elements, particularly N, P and Mg (Ohta 1988, Dela Cruz 1986). Dela Cruz (1986) concluded that the poor chemical properties of these areas made forest regeneration inImperatagrasslands technically difficult, expensive and time consuming. However, Soepardi (1980) who investigated the chemical and physical properties of soils fromImperatagrasslands in four locations on Sumatra, two on Java and one on Kalimantan concluded thatImperatasoils are not infertile to such a great extent and that grasses can even improve the fertility and physical properties of surface soils. These contradictions suggest that there may be a large degree of variation in the fertility ofImperatagrassland soils. In order to fully understand the soils of these degraded land areas, we need to know how soil characteristics vary and be able make generalisations about the relationship between soil fertility and other soil parameters.

Keywords

Clay Content Secondary Forest Primary Forest Stock Level Forest Degradation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Kazuhito Morisada
  • Nagaharu Tanaka
  • Yoshiyuki Kiyono
  • Syarif Effendi

There are no affiliations available

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