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Overview of the Changing Forest Ecosystems in East Kalimantan

  • Tokunori Mori
  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Atsushi Ishida
  • Takeshi Toma
  • Teruki Oka
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 140)

Abstract

Increasingly, attention is being focused on tropical forests. This interest has been motivated by three main concerns: 1) Tropical forests harbor the greatest biological diversity on Earth; 2) they are a major component of the global carbon cycle; and 3) they provide forest goods and services to all sectors, from the local to the global scale. These three concerns often cause conflicting problems in forest management, and forest scientists and administrators are seeking a harmonious solution. Despite recent advances in the understanding of tropical forest ecosystems, knowledge is still insignificant in relation to the three concerns mentioned above. To establish verifiable forest management methods that are ecologically sound, economically viable, socially responsible, and environmentally acceptable, both administrators and scientists including those in the fields of socio-economics, plant ecology, eco-physiology, soil science, animal ecology, entomology, mycology, pathology, silviculture, and forestry have collected accurate and detailed information about the changing forest ecosystems in the tropics.

Keywords

Tropical Rainforest Fallow Period Dipterocarp Forest Swidden Agriculture Forest Garden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tokunori Mori
  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Atsushi Ishida
  • Takeshi Toma
  • Teruki Oka

There are no affiliations available

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