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Effects of Antidepressants and Lithium on Intracellular Calcium Signaling

  • Shigeto Yamawaki
  • Ariyuki Kagaya
  • Yasumasa Okamoto
  • Minoru Takebayashi
  • Toshinari Saeki
Conference paper

Abstract

It is well known that calcium ions (Ca2+) play a crucial role in the growth and maintenance of basic cellular functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Several technical developments have contributed to the measurement of cytosolic Ca2+ in living cells. Since the most effective fluorescent dye, fura-2, and its acetoxymethyl ester derivative were developed, many studies have been performed to determine if there is an abnormal function in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in living cells. In the field of biological psychiatry, many researchers have investigated intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) using human platelets, a model of the neuron. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the investigation of Ca2+ in bipolar disorders from both clinical and basic perspectives.

Keywords

Bipolar Disorder Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizer Bipolar Affective Disorder Bipolar Disorder Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeto Yamawaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ariyuki Kagaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yasumasa Okamoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Minoru Takebayashi
    • 2
  • Toshinari Saeki
    • 2
  1. 1.Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) of Japan Science and Technology (JST)Japan
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and NeurosciencesHiroshima University School of MedicineHiroshimaJapan

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