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Superficial Esophageal Carcinomas Associated with Multiple Lesions that Do Not Stain with Iodine

  • Minako Yoshikawa
  • Hiroyuki Kato
  • Tatsuya Miyazaki
  • Masanobu Nakajima
  • Youichi Kamiyama
  • Yasuyuki Fukai
  • Kouhei Tajima
  • Norihiro Masuda
  • Hitoshi Ojima
  • Katsuhiko Tsukada
  • Hiroyuki Kuwano
Conference paper

Abstract

Esophageal cancer is a relatively common neoplasm throughout the world but is found at high frequency in many developing nations [1]. The number of superficial esophageal carcinomas identified has increased rapidly in recent years owing to advances in diagnostic methods, particularly endoscopy [2,3]. Small areas unstained with Lugol’s iodine are often observed in the mucosa surrounding esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In patients in whom this type of esophageal SCC has been resected and where the esophageal mucosa shows multiple small areas that do not stain with Lugol’s iodine, there is often multicentric cancer of the esophagus [4].

Keywords

Esophageal Cancer Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Esophageal Carcinoma Multiple Lesion Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minako Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Kato
    • 1
  • Tatsuya Miyazaki
    • 1
  • Masanobu Nakajima
    • 1
  • Youichi Kamiyama
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Fukai
    • 1
  • Kouhei Tajima
    • 1
  • Norihiro Masuda
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Ojima
    • 1
  • Katsuhiko Tsukada
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Kuwano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery 1, School of MedicineGunma UniversityMaebashi, GunmaJapan

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