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OPLL pp 65-72 | Cite as

The Pathogenesis of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum with Special Reference to Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Transforming Growth Factor-βs

  • Shimpei Miyamoto
  • Kazuo Yonenobu
  • Kunio Takaoka

Abstract

Both ankylosing spinal hyperostosis (ASH) [1] and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) [2] are well-known conditions in which hyperostosis is associated with ossification of the ligaments of the spine. Patients with ASH or DISH often develop ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) [3,4] and/or ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) [5,6], causing serious neurological complications. Protrusion of the thickened, hypertrophied, and ossified ligaments into the spinal canal leads to compression and deformation of the contiguous spinal cord and nerve roots, which cause myelopathy and radiculopathy. Patients with OPLL or OLF occasionally suffer from severe neurological deficits such as motor weakness, sensory disturbance, and urinary incontinence. Decompressive surgeries, anterior or posterior, with or without resection of the ossified ligaments and with or without spinal fusion, do not always produce a satisfactory result (see chapters by E. Taketomi et al., K. Hirabayashi et al., and K. Abumi et al., this volume). No therapeutic agent is known to prevent the development or growth of OPLL and OLF.

Keywords

Spinal Canal Endochondral Ossification Ligamentum Flavum Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Bone Alkaline Phosphatase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shimpei Miyamoto
    • 1
  • Kazuo Yonenobu
    • 1
  • Kunio Takaoka
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryOsaka University Medical SchoolSuita, Osaka, 565Japan
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryShinshu University School of MedicineMatsumoto, Nagano, 390Japan

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