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Localization of Heparin-Like Compounds in Cultured Aortic Endothelial Cells

  • K. Takeuchi
  • K. Shimada
  • M. Nishinaga
  • S. Kimura
  • T. Ozawa
Conference paper

Abstract

The non-thrombogenic properties of blood vessels are due, in part, to anticoagulant heparin-like compounds on the luminal surface of vascular endothelial cells. A certain class of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) associated with the endothelial surface can bind antithrombin III (AT III) in plasma and can accelerate the thrombin inactivation by the protease inhibitor. HSPGs are also known to be located along the abluminal side of the endothelium, namely basement membrane or extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by endothelial cells1. Thus, questions exist regarding the localization of anticoagulant HSPG in endothelial cells. Does ECM contain HSPGs which interact with antithrombin III? If they exist, how abundant are they, as compared to those in the luminal surface?

Keywords

Heparan Sulfate Chondroitin Sulfate Anti Thrombin Luminal Surface Aortic Endothelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Takeuchi
    • 1
  • K. Shimada
    • 2
  • M. Nishinaga
    • 1
  • S. Kimura
    • 1
  • T. Ozawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine and GeriatricsKochi Medical SchoolKochi 783Japan
  2. 2.Department of CardiologyJichi Medical SchoolTochigiJapan

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